What size should the machine be?

Design of structural and load bearing framework.
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Keith
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby Keith » Fri Dec 17, 2010 11:28 am

Mike you could always "pay it forward" and give a friend the MDF parts and then help that person build their own machine....
Just a thought.....

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beermkr
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby beermkr » Fri Dec 17, 2010 1:01 pm

Yeah, the book machine will probably go to my Dad. He is the one that sent me the link that rekindled my interest. If he doesn't want it I will find a home for it for sure.

R/
Mike Pensinger
Chief Brewer, The River Company Brewery, Radford, VA

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Awesomeness
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby Awesomeness » Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:42 am


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larry104
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby larry104 » Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:37 pm

I'm also in favor of a true 2' X 4' working area.

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Awesomeness
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby Awesomeness » Sun Dec 19, 2010 6:17 pm

Needing 2 sheets of MDF to make a machine with a 2'x4' working area might not be too bad, since you're going to need spoil board anyways. So if you use 2 sheets, 1/4 of one sheet is the spoil board, and you have 1 3/4 sheets for construction of the machine.

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daishion
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby daishion » Tue Dec 21, 2010 6:37 pm

I think it is important to have a true 2x4 size people can use the "handy sheets" as a basis for things they are going to make. I also agree with the plans and the standard size. I am currently building my first machine and while I consider my self a decent wood worker I pretty much had never heard of CNC routing until I stumbled across the machine while I was in rockler picking up some supplies. I think it is important to insure success on the first go round so people will stay motivated.

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Awesomeness
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby Awesomeness » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:50 pm

It sounds like a machine with a 2'x4' routable area is winning here.

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airnocker
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby airnocker » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:55 pm

Yep, so what does everyone figure the actual table dimensions will need to be? 26" x 54" or what?
airnocker
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Awesomeness
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby Awesomeness » Wed Dec 22, 2010 12:11 am

That's probably close. The best thing might be to design the z-axis carriage, since that defines the distance between the cutting bit and the limit of travel. That will dictate how much larger than the cutting area the table needs to be.

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JiB
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Re: What size should the machine be?

Postby JiB » Thu Dec 23, 2010 10:42 pm

from what I see in the fablab where I work, there are three sizes that you need. 1 is the desktop router with a working area of say 200 + 130mm. There are not too many jobs like that (I saw two today, but thats an exception). Next up are the smallish jobs that would fit a 2x4 (clothing accessories, guitar bodies, snowshoes). I think most jobs would fit that size, but not 80%. A large fraction uses the whole bed (8x4). All/most jobs can be done on the 8x4, but most would use only a small portion of the machine.
So, 2x4 is a good size to aim for, for a gantry type machine. Another option is to use a different layout for the machine, and have it grip the material between (2x)2 rollers and move it trough a stationary YZ frame. The downside is that you need twice as much working space in the X direction, and you will continously have people doubt you it will work.


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